Carsegowan Moss

Introduction

Carsegowan Moss is one of the best examples of a lowland raised peat bog in Galloway. Cranberry and bog rosemary grow in the Sphagnum carpet and adders bask in the heather. Hen harriers, merlins, short-eared owls and barn owls can be occasionally seen hunting across the bog.

Description

The majority of Carsegowan Moss is covered by bog vegetation despite past drainage activity, although in the drier areas patches of heath vegetation can be found. 

Carsegowan Moss was once part of a larger system of peatlands found on the upper reaches of the Wigtown Bay estuary, much of which was lost to agriculture or forestry.

Project Aims

Scottish Wildlife Trust hope to continue clearing encroaching woodland and encourage bog forming vegetation where currently purple moor grass (Molinia caerulea) dominates. Drainage ditches also need to be dammed to keep water on site.

In the long term, the Trust would also like to use low level grazing to supress tree regeneration and heather growth. This will require additional fencing to effectively control the stock.

Restoration Delivered

Encroaching coniferous woodland has been cleared over the last couple of decades, to help prevent drying out the peat.

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Project Name: Carsegowan Moss

Organisation / Lead partner: Scottish Wildlife Trust

Location: Wigtown, Galloway

Approximate area covered: 49 ha

Conservation Status: Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), Special Area of Conservation (SAC)

Predominately: Lowland

Peat Habitats: Lowland raised bog

Project Type: Management

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