Duddon Mosses NNR

Introduction

Duddon Mosses is a lowland rasied bog, which is rich in wildlife with adders, lizards, cottongrass, bog asphodel, and notably, the rare moss Sphagnum pulchrum among the species here. The peat in this lowland raised bog is thought to be around 7,000 years old and up to 6 m deep.

Striking views can be enjoyed of the Lakeland fells.

Description

Duddon Mosses has been shaped over thousands of years, created during the last Ice Ace after which estuarine clays were deposited across the coastal plain. High rainfall led to the establishment of shallow lakes and a change in vegetation from fens and wet woodland to bog, with the establishment of Sphagnum moss populations leading to peat formation over the last 7,000 years.

The site suffered extensive peat cutting for fuel on its periphery in the 18th and 19th centuries. Drainage for agriculture and forestry, has led to parts becoming too dry for Sphagnum, these areas instead now supporting heather and trees.

Restoration Delivered

EU funding since 2004 has allowed Natural England to carry out restoration work, as well as purchase more of the Mosses, so that they can be managed sympathetically.

Work on the whole has focussed on re-establishing the water table, by carrying out the following activities:

  • Drain blocking
  • Scrub removal
  • Peat reprofiling.

It is hoped in time these re-wetting techniques will enable active bog flora to re-establish and peat formation to commence.

The nature reserve is open to visitors, with a boardwalk on parts to help reduce erosion.

Biodiversity

The bog flora support a wide range of invertebrates, including the specialist bog bush cricket, which is close to its northern limit here.

Birds of prey including buzzard and barn owl hunt here, whilst summer passerines breed and feed. In addition waders and geese make use of the areas of open water in winter.

{"zoom":12,"lat":54.2612216,"lon":-3.1805342,"markers":{"0":{"lat":54.2612216,"lon":-3.1805342}}}

Project Name: Duddon Mosses NNR

Organisation / Lead partner: Natural England

Location: Broughton-in-Furness, Cumbria

Approximate area covered: 80 ha

Conservation Status: Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), Special Area of Conservation (SAC), Nature Reserve (NR), National Nature Reserves(NNR)

Predominately: Lowland

Peat Habitats: Lowland raised bog

Project Type: Restoration, Management

Useful Downloads:

Dawn at Marches Mosses by Stephen Barlow
Marches Mosses marks 30-year milestone in fight against climate change An internationally important lowland raised peat bog between England and Wales celebrates its 30th…
Virtual Peatland Pavilion
Virtual Peatland Pavilion for COP26 UNFCCCWe are delighted to launch a new dome in the Virtual Peatland Pavilion for COP26 UNFCCC.
Peat-free Horticulture: Demonstrating Success
New report shows peat-free opportunity for horticulture industry'Peat-free Horticulture – Demonstrating Success' is now the third publication in the series and was…
Peatland Pavilion at COP26
Peatland Pavilion at UNFCCC COP26 - Online Registration openThe Peatland Pavilion at UNFCCC COP26 will highlight the importance of global peatlands for the…
A virtual tour will include peatland restoration research at SRUC's Kirkton and Auchtertyre farms.
Climate solutions from peatlands to parasitesAs world leaders arrive in Glasgow for the UN Climate Change Conference (COP26), scientific experts…
Figure 2
Research reveals a quarter of Europe’s peatlands are degraded, ahead of key climate and biodiversity summitsNew research finds that 25% of Europe’s peatlands are degraded, increasing to 50% -120,000km2- when…
MFFP image
Peak District study reveals depths of carbon stored in threatened landscapesWith the UN Climate Conference (COP26) being held in Glasgow in under one months’ time, a new study…
WaterLANDS logo
WaterLANDS: New European Green Deal project launched to lead largescale restoration of European wetlandsAn ambitious project has been launched to tackle largescale restoration of Europe’s wetlands, with…
A detail from the map indicating areas of the highest carbon potential (in red) derived from the peat motion map covering the period 2016-21.  Potential carbon savings and their market value per annum are indicated for the different areas highlighted.
Satellite Map Identifies Peatland Areas where Restoration has the Greatest Carbon ImpactPeatland organisations and experts from across the globe have joined together to pledge their…
Peatland Pavilion concept
Peatland Pavilion will feature at UN Climate Change Conference (COP26)The Peatland Pavilion will provide a hub for highlighting the important role that peatlands play…
Bord na mona
United Nations recognizes major Irish Peatland Restoration initiativeDianna Kopansky of the United Nations Environment Programme has recognised the initiative led by…
GPI logo
Open call! Your opportunity to participate as a Contributing Author for the GPI’s upcoming Global Peatlands AssessmentThe Global Peatlands Initiative are currently looking for Contributing Authors (CAs) to participate…