Langlands Moss LNR

Introduction

Langlands Moss is a lowland raised peat bog situated on the southern fringe of the ‘New’ town of East Kilbride, South Lanarkshire. In 1994/5 the importance of Langlands Moss was recognised and it was decided to restore the bog to improve public access and to safeguard the site`s long term future. As part of the restoration, dams were installed to block drains and raise the water level. A commercial conifer plantation was felled (using a helicopter to remove the trees) and a boardwalk was built across the bog to allow public access. It was designated as a Local Nature Reserve and formally established in 1996.

This included and still includes general monitoring of the site, the hydrological and biodiversity aspects, as well as undertaking practical work and supervising work parties.

The Friends of Langlands Moss were formally constituted in September 2006 under the convenorship of Richard Naismith to work in partnership with South Lanarkshire Council and various conservation and interested parties in conserving this most important habitat, which they felt had been neglected over a number of years. Their aim is to improve and conserve Langlands Moss Local Nature Reserve for the benefit of all.

Description

Langlands Moss is a lowland raised peat bog situated on the southern fringe of the industrial town of East Kilbride, South Lanarkshire. Designated as an Local Nature Reserve (LNR) in 1996, a programme of restoration of the bog has been in place for nearly 20 years. Introduced by East Kilbride District Council and East Kilbride Development Corporation in 1994, the primary aims of this restoration programme were to improve the condition of Langlands Moss and to enhance public access to the area.

As part of this original restoration, a commercial conifer plantation on the peat was felled (using a helicopter to remove the trees), and dams were installed to block drains and raise the water level. In addition, a boardwalk was built across the bog to allow public access. Since the designation of Local Nature Reserve status, many of the original drainage dams had become damaged through fire, vandalism and weather. This meant that the bog was slowly drying out. The first task the Friends set themselves was to begin a new damming programme on the Moss. Finance was obtained from The Big Lottery Fund and Scottish National Heritage to purchase the necessary damming material. To date, volunteers have installed 28 dams in the main ditch which runs across Langlands Moss. This work has resulted in a marked improvement in water levels and Sphagnum mosses, and other bog plants are already re-colonising the new pools of standing water.

Site Activity

The Friends of Langlands Moss continue to carry out the essential work needed to protect and conserve this lowland raised bog. Currently applying to various funding streams, their next task is to replace the existing boardwalk, which is deteriorating rapidly due to weather conditions. Once installed, a new boardwalk will greatly improve access for visitors to enjoy the Moss and enable the bog conservation programme to continue. As well as further damming of ditches and tree removal, the long-term plan for Langlands Moss is to create a buffer boundary around the bog to improve water retention and to continue with the ongoing activities to raise public awareness about the importance of peatlands.

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Project Name: Langlands Moss LNR

Organisation / Lead partner: Friends of Langlands Moss

Location: East Kilbride, Glasgow

Approximate area covered: 20 ha

Conservation Status: Local Nature Reserve

Predominately: Lowland

Peat Habitats: Lowland raised bog

Project Type: Restoration, Management

Year Project Began: 1994

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