Reviving the peatland ecosystem of Ganges Tidal Floodplain

Introduction

This project focuses on the peatlands of the Ganges tidal floodplain, which are characterised by the organic materials that occupy more than half of the upper 80 cm of the profile and can also be present in different layers within the same soil.

Description

Bangladesh has approximately 224,700 ha of peatland habitat, covering around 1.6% of the total area of the country. These peatlands are distributed between the Ganges river floodplain and the Ganges tidal floodplain in Gopalgonj, Bagerhat, as well as in the adjoining parts of Khulna, Barisal, and Jessore districts of Bangladesh. There are also limited peat deposits in the Sylhet basins in the north-east of the country. Despite this coverage, peatland is viewed as marginal land in Bangladesh and has not received much attention over the years. Lack of public awareness and weak environmental regulations are the primary drivers of peatland conversion and depletion in the country. The main threats to this peatland ecosystem include; 1.The use of peat soil as fuel for the conventional cooking stoveused by local people 2.The extraction of snails from the habitat to be used as feed for commercial shrimpfarms 3.The conversion of peatland to cropland through drainage and embankment 4.The pollution from fertilizer and pesticide washout from nearby agricultural fields

Project Aims

Using Geographic Information System (GIS) and remote sensing, a land use map of peatland will be generated to better understand the spatial temporal status of the habitat. It is recognised that increased collaboration between government, NGOs, educational institutions and the local community will play an important role in conserving this important natural resource and protecting the environment. The research team plan to work with the local farming community to identify alternative options for income generation, including multi-storied agroforestry systems and quail farming, so that peatland conversion can be avoided.

Site Activity

A research team from Bangabandhu Sheik Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University took the initiative in the middle of 2012 to conserve the peatlands of the Ganges tidal floodplain. They carried out a baseline survey to assess the current status of the peatland, identify the major threats to the peatland ecosystem, and finally to design a framework to manage the resource. A GPS data of land use identified 29 different land use types in the area, including dry cropland, wet cropland, fish farm and settlement. Raising awareness among the local community of how valuable the wetlands are, and increasing their participation in conservation efforts, has been identified as a vital aspect of managing this environment. So far awareness raising activities have been carried out with 120 farming families, as well as two schools.

{"zoom":6,"lat":23.684994,"lon":90.356331}

Project Name: Reviving the peatland ecosystem of Ganges Tidal Floodplain

Organisation / Lead partner: Bangabandhu Sheik Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University

Predominately: Upland

Dubh lochans and blanket bog at The Flows NNR near Forsinard, Caithness. June 2011 ©Lorne Gill/SNH/2020VISION
Scottish Budget 2020-21The Scottish Government announces £20 million for peatland restoration and a commitment to invest £…
Land use: policies for a Net Zero UK CCC report
Committee on Climate Change Report on Land Use: Policies for a Net Zero UKThe IUCN UK Peatland Programme welcomes strengthened policy and legislative recommendations in the…
Multiple effects of peatland drainage
New resource available: Explaining the impact of peatland drainage.Illustrating the multiple effects of peatland drainage including implications for carbon emissions…
Managed burning of heather © North Pennines AONB
A burning issue: comparison between Australian & UK fire management misses the mark. The news of the ongoing Australian fires is deeply concerning both in terms of the impact on people…
IUCN Resolution 43 reporting
IUCN Resolution 43 reportingNew report on progress under IUCN Resolution 43: Securing the future of global peatlands available…
Langlands Moss Restoration works underway
Langlands Moss Restoration works underwayLanglands Moss Local Nature Reserve, on the south edge of East Kilbride, Scotland is set to be…
Snowdonia Society volunteers creating heather bale dams on the Migneint, Snowdonia. © Dan Struthers Photography
Working together for the future of Welsh peatlandsA major programme of works is underway this season to restore peatlands across Wales. A large…
European Peatland Strategies workshop - Bonn, Germany
European Peatland Strategies workshop - Bonn, Germany Over 30 representatives from across 12 European countries attended a workshop to examine existing…
Bog cotton landscape © Stephen Price
Peatlands and the climate emergency2019 has seen all four devolved governments across the UK declare a climate emergency which will…
Richard Payne
A tribute to Richard Payne The IUCN UK Peatlands Programme team were all saddened to hear the shocking news about the death of…
Image of sphagnum in pool © Joe Holden
Sphagnum is a key ingredient of natural flood managementIn 2008 iCASP published research that showed how water running over Sphagnum on blanket peatlands…
Image of V-notch in ply-sheet dam © Emma Shuttleworth
Peat restoration and natural flood managementThe Upland Environments Research Unit at the University of Manchester has been working closely with…